Appreciation

Main Character Growth

the way a character grows in his attempt to solve his problems

Explanation:

Two parts to a Main Character's arc: the Main Character Resolve and the Main Character Growth. This is the second part, the part that has more to do with the process of arcing from where they are at the beginning of a story to where they are at the end. Main Characters will grow by either dropping an element or gaining a new one. If they drop, they are a Stop character; if they gain, then they are a Start character.

Narrative First

Main Character Growth

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  • Development of Character Arc

    All growth is not transformative; sometimes a character stands fast to their resolve in order to change the world around them.

  • Every Character Should Have An Arc

    But not every character should necessarily change--an idea that runs contrary to the prevailing wisdom in modern storytelling.

  • Dramatica Simplified

    A simple way to look at the theory's eight essential dynamic story points of narrative.

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Original Dramatica® Definition:

Change Characters see their problems as being inside themselves. Steadfast Characters see their problems as being outside themselves. Sometimes a problem is created by too much of something, other times by too little. Growth describes whether a problem is "too much" of something, or "too little." It appears differently depending on if the Main Character Changes or Remains Steadfast. If a character must change, he has one of these two kinds of problems. Either he is bullheaded in sticking with an inappropriate approach or he simply doesn't use an approach that would be appropriate. In the "too much" scenario, the character comes off as aggressively obstinate. In the "too little" scenario the character comes off as stubbornly ignorant. The "too much" Change Character needs to "stop." The "too little" Change Character needs to "start." If the Main Character remains Steadfast, though, then the kinds of problems they'll face will involve either holding out for something to Start or holding out for something to Stop. Metaphorically, the Steadfast Character is either a storm trying to weather away an island, or an island trying to hold out against a storm. Both Change and Steadfast Characters grow in a direction which can be called "Start" or "Stop."